Important Advice For All Runners

Jun 12, 2013   //   by James Dunne   //   Triathlon And Endurance Coaching  //  8 Comments  //  Affiliate Disclosure  

Things You Wish You’d Been Told When You Started

This morning I asked the following question on Twitter:

Top Twitter Tips

I certainly know that my own running training has been (and is) a voyage of trial and error.

Arguably I should know better… Like many of us, I learn by doing – mostly from my mistakes!

Having been inundated with the many responses to my question, I thought I’d share a selection of tips in today’s blog post :)

What Advice Would You Give?

Feel free to leave your favourite tips in the comments section below…

About The Author

James has an academic background in Sport Rehabilitation and a special interest in Applied Biomechanics. He currently coaches a large number of Runners and Triathletes across all levels of ability and performance. He's grown a strong reputation for enabling athletes to improve their running performance and overcome running injuries through improving their Running Technique and developing Running Specific Strength.

 

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8 Comments

  • Don’t be too scared to run more often. Just build up to it slowly. Frequency is king!

    Core work works. Not just sit-ups but balance and stability work.

  • Running the same distances at the same paces will leave you the same runner. If you want to change, then introduce changes into your running routine. If you don’t push yourself, then you won’t move.

  • Don’t ignore the importance of warming up and building up slowly to your desired pace when training.

  • Nipguards

  • 1- Enjoy, 2 – Strengthen glutes, core and hamstrings, 3 – Do drills regularly, 4 – Do easy runs EASY, 5 – Get flexible especially hips, 6 – Join a group/club, 7 – Run off road, 8 – Run relaxed, don’t think, 9 – Stop when injured, 10 – Warm up properly.

  • Would have rather slowed down and work on form/consistent miles than go fast for pointless ” look I can run really fast” points on a daily basis. And mainly on main streets in whichever towns.
    – prove it race time, it’s nice to get great workouts in but what counts is on paper and the watch.

  • I have tried to run from time to time. Never seemed to improve, got tired straight away. After a while I quit. Tried two years later for a couple of weeks or months, same thing. Last year I spoke to a friend about this, and he asked me two questions:

    1, If you see somebody ahead of you, are you then trying to outrun that person?
    My answer: Yes.
    He: Well, don’t. Keep your own pace. It’s not a race you know. You’ll just get tired in advance.

    2, When you come to a steep hill, do you run faster than you usually do?
    My answer: No, I’m not that stupid.
    He: Check next time…

    So I thought about it, and noticed that I in fact ran faster when I got to that steep hill. It’s appearantly a common mistake. It made me really tired of course, and my legs didn’t want to continue running after that. Now I take it pretty slow in these steep hills and have really started to enjoy running. I’m still a novice though, but not as tired as before.

  • 1. Learn to love the cold water tap and the massage-setting on your shower. 2. Repeat after me – “I love Hills!” 3. Once you love Hills try to sprint (or at least tempo) up every one. 4. It is true – the motor you have you were probably born with. But you can tune the **** out of anything! 5. Best technique for running downhill is to relax and try to control gravity rather than your body (controlled falling).

    *Last point. Humans learn how to run before we learn how to walk. Most natural thing we do!*

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