Episode 6: Winter Training & Periodisation with Neil Scholes

Nov 25, 2013   //   by James Dunne   //    //  2 Comments  //  Affiliate Disclosure  

On the podcast this week we discuss winter training and periodisation for endurance athletes. How does your training plan look this winter, and why?

We also answer an interesting question which came in via Twitter, about High Intensity Interval Training as a means to improve VO2 max…

Episode Resources

Dr Tudor Bompa

For those unfamiliar with the work of Dr Tudor Bomba, often regarded as the father of periodisation theory, below are a couple of links his popular publications:

Professor Paul Laursen

Neil mentioned the research published by Professor Paul Laursen. More information about his work can be found here and here.


Professor Tim Noakes

If you’re interested in finding out more about Professor Tim Noakes’ Central Governor Model, Jeff Gaudette has written an interesting article on the theory over at RunnersConnect.net


Twitter Question of The Week

I think we should turn this into a regular feature… so keep your questions coming in!

About The Author

James has an academic background in Sport Rehabilitation and a special interest in Applied Biomechanics. He currently coaches a large number of Runners and Triathletes across all levels of ability and performance. He's grown a strong reputation for enabling athletes to improve their running performance and overcome running injuries through improving their Running Technique and developing Running Specific Strength.

 

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2 Comments

  • Enjoyed this. I think I’m guilty of too much speed work in my run training without the base in place. That said, I’m surprised you didn’t mention XC as an important winter training option for runners in the northern hemisphere. With 5km my main target (pb 18.23), long term goal sub 17, what sort of base would you suggest needs to be in place? Cheers, keep up the good work.

  • Kevin,

    Many thanks for your kind words and you are not alone in being guilty of spending either too much time on the “icing” when your “cake” is lacking or spending too much time in the grey area between easy and hard. I am a huge fan of XC, despite not mentioning it in the podcast, as you can see from this post:

    http://www.kinetic-revolution.com/cross-country-running-specific-training-demands/

    I encourage all of my athletes to get off road on the trails or race XC during their Winter seasons. In terms of your own training I’m afraid there would be a great deal of information I would require to give that question any justice with an appropriate answer, if I was coaching you I would start by asking you complete a comprehensive questionnaire. Sorry there is no easy way or easy answer – a bit like performance improvement really.

    Neil

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